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Clinical experience with primary orbital tumors from a neurosurgical perspective
J Korean Skull Base Soc 2021;16(2):63-70
Published online September 30, 2021
© 2021 Korean Skull Base Society.

Jung Jae Oh, Dong-Sup Chung, Wan-Soo Yoon

Department of Neurosurgery, Incheon St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea
Correspondence to: Wan-Soo Yoon
주소 : Department of Neurosurgery, Incheon St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 56 Dongsu-ro, Bupyeong-gu, Incheon 21431, Korea
Tel : +82-32-280-5973
Fax : +82-32-280-5991
E-mail : yowas@catholic.ac.kr
Received August 20, 2021; Accepted September 5, 2021.
Abstract
Background : Primary orbital tumors are relatively rarely encountered by neurosurgeons. Several approaches to primary orbital tumors have been used depending upon the tumor location, preoperative diagnosis, and the surgeon’s experience. Here, we present our clinical experience with primary orbital tumors from a neurosurgical perspective.
Methods : A total of 11 patients with primary orbital tumors who underwent surgical resections between January 2011 and December 2018 were included in the study. All clinical data, including preoperative symptoms, visual function, operation record, histopathology, and radiologic imaging were reviewed.
Results : The median age of the patients was 55 years, and diplopia and impaired vision were the most common symptoms. Depending upon the tumor location in the orbit, the intraconal type was seen in eight patients, the intracanalicular type was seen in two, and the extraconal type was seen in one. Surgery on these tumors was performed by the transcranial approach in nine patients and the endoscopic endonasal approach in two, depending upon the meridian of the optic nerve. Gross total resection was completed in five patients, subtotal resection in one, partial resection in one, and biopsies in four. Postoperatively, visual function was improved in two of four (50%) patients, and preexisting vision was preserved in the other nine patients.
Conclusions : Although the experience with primary orbital tumors was limited, we suggest that favorable surgical outcomes can be achieved with an appropriate surgical approach by understanding the anatomy of the orbit, especially the meridian of the optic nerve.
Keywords : Orbit, Neoplasms, Neurosurgery, Vision, Optic nerve


September 2021, 16 (2)
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